2020 Candidate Survey

UW Impact conducts a non-partisan candidate survey prior to every Washington State legislative election in order to provide alums and UWAA members with information on the candidates who champion the value of public higher education.

Please see below for your candidates’ answers to UW Impact’s 2020 higher education questionnaire. You may search by candidate* name, legislative district and sort information within each column by clicking the arrows to the left of the column header. Answers followed by a green plus sign have expanded content. Click the yes or no answer to see the candidate’s full commentary.

The survey is updated frequently with new submissions from mid-September through the election. If you do not see your candidate(s) listed below, he or she has not yet filled out a survey. Want to urge your candidate to do so? Let us know who you’d like to see, and we will contact him or her directly.

*Indicates an incumbent candidate.

Don’t know where to start? » Find your district

Name:

Chamber:

Legislative District:

Will you work to ensure that higher education does not bear more than its fair share of coming budget cuts?…

Read more

The state’s revenue shortfall means public institutions face significant budget cuts. During the last recession, state lawmakers slashed higher education funding by more than 50% because they expected institutions to raise tuition to cover it. In the era of COVID-19 and state-capped tuition, this approach will not work. Will you work to ensure that higher education does not bear more than its fair share of coming budget cuts?

Despite this expected shortfall, will you work to maintain the funding commitments made in the WEIA?…

Read more

2019’s Washington Education Investment Act (WEIA) fully funded state-based aid, expanded STEM enrollments to provide graduates for our state’s biggest employers, and provided critical foundational institutional support. The fund could face a shortfall of millions of dollars due to the current economic crisis. Learn more about WEIA here. Despite this expected shortfall, will you work to maintain the funding commitments made in the WEIA?

Do you support funding our public institutions specifically to address equity gaps in education and encourage economic mobility?…

Read more

All six of Washington’s public universities and the State Board for Technical and Community Colleges made public racial equity commitments during the heightened racial tensions this summer. Studies have shown a widening wealth gap and inequitable higher education policies have hindered BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, people of color) students’ ability to persist in post-secondary education and to reap the economic and societal benefits of education beyond high school. Do you support funding our public institutions specifically to address equity gaps in education and encourage economic mobility?

Will you work with your colleagues in the legislature to support financial solutions for UW Medicine in its unique role as the state’s academic medical center?…

Read more

UW Medicine is facing temporary furloughs and reduced staff, with over $500 million lost due to a very necessary COVID-19 response. Will you work with your colleagues in the legislature to support financial solutions for UW Medicine in its unique role as the state’s academic medical center?

Bob Apple House, Pos. 2 3 Yes

As an elected official I will represent my constituents wishes on any and all issues and above those of special interests. Tragically I believe the impacts of COVID will exceed those of the 08' recession as we look at evictions and foreclosures from US Congressional failures. Money and from where will bring big issues.
Yes

However the recipients must be WA State residents who have grown up in WA only that include the constituents of mine and other districts equally represented. I am concerned about limited time residents coming here to scarf up resources I believe should assist our residents children only.
No

I believe we should be treated all equally and fix any part of our government that fails to recognize that fact that has made our nation great. I do believe there has been a divide of less middle class families pushed towards poverty but that is occurring irrespective of race in my region where minimum wage is the often a guide to general pay rather than abilities determining higher pay and a business able and willing to pay higher wages. Simply discrimination is not something I will advocate and regardless of claimed justifications.
Yes

Clearly with the UW Higher Education medical training facility in my District we should make it a win-win for residents and students alike in attaining the education and assisting others throughout the process. Further we need to make the desire to practice medicine more desirable and limiting liability of trained professionals to practice there developing expertise with oversight should help with that goal in the long term. Our State offers various medical coverage and perhaps should offer even more to our residents and to save far more in the long run.
Andy Billig* Senate 3 Yes See Comments

All areas of state government may face potential funding reductions and the WEIA will probably not be exempt. However, I am hoping that any such reductions are minimal.
Yes No answer provided
Larry Stanley House, Pos. 2 8 Yes

Yes last time there was too large of cuts.
Yes Yes Yes
Zack Hudgins* House, Pos. 1 11 Yes Yes

I was proud to support the WEIA to get it passed into law.
Yes Yes
Jack McEntire House, Pos. 1 15 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Carly Coburn House, Pos. 2 16 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Peter Abbarno House, Pos. 1 20 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Jessica Bateman House, Pos. 2 22 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Garry Holland Senate 22 Yes

Students and parents may have a much harder time paying the existing tuition and costs. Unfortunately, the higher education system will be subject to cost cutting to the tune of at least 25%.
No

The increased business and operating tax damages small businesses and results in more small businesses failing especially in this covid environment where many of them have been closed for 5 months. Maybe we should raise taxes on some essential services like Marijuana, alcohol and cigarettes to pay for this program.
Yes

Your chart shows that 34% of blacks who make $129000 per year default on their student loans. I question the validity of your question as we have a unique and quality education system in this state. Those who find it difficult to pay for college usually go to a Community College for their first two years and then with student loans and grants go to one of our Universities for their third and fourth year. Any person may choose to educate through the system and yes, we can help them out.
Yes

They need the support. Unfortunately, the governor decided in flattening the curve, the curve that never happened. If real science was involved we would have made adjustments when we realized the panicked response to Covid was over doing it. The medical center should have reopened with precautions. Knowing that UW was part of the panic forecasting I find it difficult to come up with a financial solution that the university helped cause.
Ryan Talen House, Pos. 1 27 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Jesse Johnson* House, Pos. 2 30 Yes Yes Yes Yes
David Wiley House, Pos. 2 38 See Comments

What is a fair share? The typical disingenuous politician would say yes of course and then do whatever they want. I am here to be honest. 2021 is going to force steep cuts. There is no more money for pork projects. We have to look at essentials and what can be voluntarily funded by what people are willing to pay. Most importantly we need to focus on getting the economy jumpstarted again or this shortfall could be prolonged or even get worse if we choke the economy with payroll and business taxes.
See Comments

Again, I'm not here to make vapid and empty campaign promises. The WEIA was shortsightedly funded on a B&O production tax. Now the economy is gutted and little funding is coming in through the B&O tax because businesses are dying. To increase this tax will kill more small businesses which we need. Smarter taxation will eliminate production taxes and shift to consumption taxes or service fees. This economic relief and funding for critical services must come before we even look at beneficial services like WEIA.
See Comments

Right now we are struggling to fund essential services in the State. Medical, Fire, Education. I am sure many well intentioned people will say yes to this, but in 2021 we will be struggling to keep the lights on and staff paid in many institutions. I would also much rather identify these inequitable higher education policies and put an end to them. I am not concerned that some people have made themselves rich in private enterprise, but I am very concerned that a great many people are homeless or impoverished in our state because of harmful state policies which enrich a few well connected people.
Yes

This is one of the essential services that must be funded. However, I do not accept the premise that during a pandemic response we needed to furlough and cut health workers. We need to be adaptive and keep people in good health to fight disease. We need to allow businesses and departments like UW medicine to come up with solutions to public health issues instead of simply ordering them shut down.
Mike Sells* House, Pos. 2 38 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Al Rosenthal House, Pos. 2 41 Yes See Comments

I would have to know more details.
No

Admissions to Washington State Universities should be based on ability to academically perform. We should never pass laws that discriminate based on race, like many Washington State representatives want to do. Washington State Universities should set a priority on enrolling Washington residents, since it is our state taxpayers who are subsidizing these schools. I think it is being racist against Asians who push their kids to work hard in school. There should be an effort to get everyone to work harder in schools, not a race quota system to get into state universities.
Yes

Would need more details.
Lisa Wellman* Senate 41 Yes Yes

We are dealing with multiple crisis: COVID, inequities and racism. But austerity now will exacerbate the impacts for low and middle-income students and lead to longer recovery time.
Yes

Previous comments
Yes
Sharon Shewmake* House, Pos. 2 42 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Leslie Klein House, Pos. 1 43 Yes Yes See Comments

Would need more information to form an opinion
Yes
Gerry Pollet* House, Pos. 1 46 Yes

We should have learned from our state's mistakes in response to the Great Recession that cutting access to higher education, raising tuition and slashing advising, created real human harm and actually delayed our state's recovery. I'm committed to fully funding our new commitment to the Washington College Grant and ensuring that residents of our State have access to the opportunities of workforce training and degrees. I support progressive revenues and closing large loopholes so we do not backslide on opportunity and investment in higher education.
Yes

YES!. To recover from the COVID Pandemic depression, we need to provide Washingtonians with increased access and supports - mentoring and advising to get their degrees or workforce training. I'm committed to fully funding our promise to Washington students and their families that a College Grant is available to them if their family income is below our state median.
Yes

Yes, I've led legislative efforts and will continue to work to improve retention and completion for underserved minority students, DACA recipients, LGBTQ+ students. I will continue to advocate to increase the diversity of our faculty, which is crucial to increase student diversity and retention.
Yes

I've been working since the Pandemic began to assist UW Medicine to access CARES Act funding provided to Washington and other state and federal resources.
J. D. Ingram House, Pos. 1 22 Yes

"Fair share" will be difficult to determine, and no one will be happy with the budget.
Yes

Given that the funding is based, in part, on business tax revenue, the intended recipients should plan accordingly, and not expect a further increase in tax rates.
No Yes

All state supported organizations need to be cognizant that the revenue picture of February 202 no longer exists, and expectations need to be realistic.
Marcus Riccelli* House, Pos. 1 3 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Bill Ramos* House, Pos. 1 5 Yes

Yes, I will. We learned in the last recession these kinds of cuts do not work, and with that knowledge in mind we will have to look elsewhere to make up for the deficit. I have been a long-time believer in the value of quality education, and that we need to make obtaining that education easier, not more difficult. If we are to ever work for equity and social justice, education is the key element that is needed. Rising tuition has made the promise of a good education impossible for many Washington residents, and I will work to make education more accessible.
Yes

Yes, we will still be committed to WEIA. While it is true the financial crisis has impacted businesses, and therefore revenue sources for this program, we will work to keep it funded as intended.
Yes

Yes I do. Education is the long term solution for equity and social justice.
Yes

Yes, I will work with my colleagues to find a solution for UW Medicine, because their role as an education center and medical center, are both high priorities at this time.
Joe Fitzgibbon* House, Pos. 2 34 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Emily Wicks* House, Pos. 1 38 Yes

I commit to seeking progressive revenue avenues to pay for investments in essential programs, services, and housing. We are facing an $8+ billion budget shortfall due to the COVID-19 Pandemic and this will be the biggest issue that we must address in order to move our progressive values forward. Most groups are going to be working hard to ensure their priorities and efforts don't get defunded as we work to shore up resources. Working to prevent cuts to critical services starts with closing tax loopholes, and I am committed to being vigilant in doing that more so than I've seen happen in years passed. This session should be bad news for well-funded lobby groups, and not those working to provide basic needs and support our most vulnerable. We need to prioritize our people, families, workers and the vulnerable so they are healthy, housed, safe, and have the necessary financial resources to be active partners in helping our small businesses, regional industries, and overall economic recovery. As we continue to face budget shortfalls and a regressive tax system, finding new sources of funding will be one of our biggest issues and challenges going forward. While an income tax would be more equitable, I am in favor of revenue sources like a Capital Gains Tax, a Carbon Tax, anti-speculation taxes, or a state tax similar to the Tax Excessive CEO Pay Act. The ability to purchase stocks, bonds, commercial real estate properties, or start a business takes an investment that is often only available for those with existing wealth. Those individuals’ ability to take their gains and continue building assets simply continues to consolidate individual wealth, taking from communities as a whole and giving very little back. A capital gains tax helps put all our people back into the economic system and gives everyone the opportunity to climb the economic ladder and find the American Dream. To me, these things are common sense, but the Carbon Tax failed and the Capital Gains Tax continues to face barriers. I am committed to strategically moving these items forward in the years to come and I hope you can help me identify the best methods for shifting opposing opinions and helping communicate the overall benefits to our regional and statewide voter populations.
Yes Yes

100 percent, yes!
Yes
Bill Bruch House, Pos. 2 10 Yes Yes

A "Fair Share" of funding
See Comments

I can't promise those things because the economic situation Covid has given us, as funding most likely will not be available.
Yes
Dusty Pierpoint House, Pos. 2 22 Yes No

Until the full impact of the budget is known, it would not be realistic to commit to this, although not our of the question
Yes Yes
Kirsten Harris-Talley House, Pos. 2 37 Yes

I absolutely believe in investing in higher education and as a principal believe in tuition-free higher education. I believe we need to pass equitable progressive revenue reform so we have the means necessary as a state to make that a reality for all students.
Yes

Yes, students deserve the certainty of funding.
Yes

Yes, I do. As a Black, Queer woman and a graduate of UW I know the barriers many BIPOC students face with regards to funding and completing their studies. They deserve specific funding to ameliorate those disparities and invest in their success.
Yes

Yes, we cannot lose that many family-supporting jobs and in particular healthcare jobs during this time.
Kathryn Lewandowsky Senate 39 Yes

And yet, if we were to move to a state based single payer, universal healthcare plan like SB 5222 that would save our state 9 billion dollars a year over what we all already pay every year for healthcare, we would not have to worry about any budget shortfalls.
Yes

See comment from the previous question.
Yes Yes

Again, see comment from question #1.
Matt Boehnke* House, Pos. 2 8 Yes Yes No

I support funding our public institutions, to not only address equity gaps, but also encourage women in STEM, and break down all barriers to education for all individuals. We must focus on making education a priority for everyone!
Yes
Tarra Simmons House, Pos. 1 23 Yes

If we want to come out of this COVID-19 recession stronger than we went into it, we will need the graduates our institutions of higher learning produce. Covid-19 is not a problem we can cut our way out of.
Yes

The WEIA helps to ensure that students, who need a helping hand, are able to access higher education. It is paramount that we maintain low income and middle income family’s ability to access higher education.
Yes

Yes! The only way we will be able to encourage economic mobility, is if we address equity gaps in our education system. When elected I will be strong advocate to make sure programs addressing equity gaps are funded.
Yes

UW Medicine every day is working to help our nation overcome this pandemic. As a former nurse I understand how important institutions like UW Medicine are to the health of our state. When I am elected I will work to find financial solutions, so UW Medicine can up the work it is doing.
John Stafford House, Pos. 1 37 Yes

It is imperative to avoid an austerity approach, consisting of painful cuts to social programs and higher education, in the upcoming budget negotiations in Olympia. This was the approach taken in the aftermath of the Great Recession, with disastrous results -- it devastated social programs (TANF, foster care, housing programs, etc.) as well as higher education. In order to avoid this, the state must do three things: (1) Tap into its Rainy Day Fund; (2) Institute significant new progressive taxation -- both to raise funds and also to address the fact the state has the most regressive tax system in the country; (3) Implement a hiring freeze. All of this is in the service of avoiding painful austerity cuts in the upcoming budget negotiations.
Yes

The WEIA was one of the most important legislative achievements of the 2019 Legislative Session. It made Washington State a national leader in the provision of financial aid for prospective students with financial need. Protecting funding for this act must be a top priority in the upcoming session. As noted above, in order to enable this to happen, it is imperative to adopt several strategies, including the implementation of new, progressive revenue in Washington State.
Yes

In order to address the just demands for racial justice in our country, it is imperative to focus on a number of issues. There does need to be structural reform in policing and in the criminal justice system. In addition, it is imperative to address the underlying inequities between the races that give rise to myriad problems. I support funding our public institutions to address these equity gaps. I also support the re-institution of affirmative action programs in Washington State.
Yes

I do support pursuing financial solutions for UW Medicine. It is also the case that I do believe a hiring freeze and furloughs for public employees need to be a part of the response to the budget crisis (with the other major components being tapping the rainy day fund and instituting new progressive taxation), in order to avoid painful cuts in social programs and tuition support for higher education.
Jeannie Darneille* Senate 27 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Frank Chopp* House, Pos. 2 43 Yes

To provide funding for higher education, a key part of my work and strategy involves the Workforce Education Investment legislation that I initiated and enacted in 2019. Please see my answers to the next questions.
Yes

The landmark Workforce Education Investment Act of 2019 is the best example of my work in higher education. I served as the lead architect of this historic legislation. As Speaker of the House, I initiated the idea, refined the concept over four years, helped build the coalition to support the effort, and enacted the proposal into law, working with Committee Chair Drew Hansen. The legislation mandated an entitlement for free college and university tuition for all low-income students (43 per-cent are students of color), as well as reduced tuition for middle-income students. Experts in the field have called it the best student financial aid program in the nation! In addition, the Act invested in other higher education programs (Career Connect, Guided Pathways, and others). The investments were funded by a targeted tax on certain larger businesses, the vast majority of which rely on the higher education system to produce well-educated graduates who become skilled employees of those businesses. Approximately $1 billion is being raised over four years, to start. It is the most significant legislation in support of higher education in decades. To sustain this investment, I initiated last year an advocacy coalition, Friends of the Future, and have raised funds to coordinate the efforts to protect the investments, help avoid austerity budget cuts, and expand the program in targeted ways in future years. A key component of the concept I developed for the Workforce Education Investment Act, is that the tax revenue raised goes into a dedicated account that can’t be used for other purposes. In addition, the student financial aid (Washington College Grant for low-income students), is embedded into state law as an entitlement! This makes it far more likely to be defended from austerity budget cuts. Looking ahead to the state budget debates, I have proposed two specific ideas for revenue increases targeted for higher education. I can go into detail about the two ideas, if UW Impact would like further discussion.
Yes

Yes! The entitlement for free college and university tuition for all low-income students that I enacted into state law for the College Grant, clearly helps address the long-term affordability for low-income students (43 per-cent are students of color and many are first generation students). The Friends of the Future coalition will be a virtual army to defend the entitlement for future generations in support of racial and economic equity and mobility. Two other student financial aid programs are also important: College Bound and the Washington State Opportunity Scholarship program (WSOS). Working with Brad Smith of Microsoft, I led the enactment of WSOS, a public-private partnership in which contributions to the WSOS fund by private businesses and individual donors are matched by Washington State, dollar for dollar. The scholarships are focused on STEM degrees. Eligibility to receive the Scholarships includes both low- and middle-income students. 67% are students of color and the number of first generation is very high. As part of the Workforce Education Investment Act, we targeted funding for specific programs that help low-income students achieve success and degree completion: Career Connect, Guided Pathways and others. These programs have a proven record of success. For several years, I have been a very strong supporter of and have appropriated state funding to the College Success Foundation and the Washington State Opportunity Scholarship program, which both provide mentors and support services primarily to low-income students of color. Their success rate is quite good and very inspiring.
Yes

Yes! I am directly working with the leadership of the UW Medical Center, Harborview Medical Center, and a number of employee unions to identify specific solutions. I have proposed the Health Equity And Recovery Trust -- the HEART plan, which would provide significant new progressive revenue for targeted priorities in health care, including UW Medicine. In addition, I have proposed new investments for workforce education that would include funding for the major medical education programs that UW Medicine operates.
Tracy Rushing House, Pos. 1 14 Yes

The need for budget cuts will require management with a scalpel, not a sledge-hammer. Higher education is a path to training and jobs that will help emerge us from this pandemic, and it should receive proportionate funding.
Yes

While cuts may be unavoidable across our economic spectrum, programs that prepare students for STEM fields should be prioritized for funding, as they facilitate the jobs and training that allow us to manage our evolving health, tech, and environmental crises.
Yes Yes

As a physician, I see the disparate effects of Covid-19 throughout our state as directly related to a community's ability to access providers and to the resources providers have to care for families. Medical training has never been more crucial, and it now encompasses care provision, public health, and community leadership. UW as our state's academic medical center depends on policies that allow it to optimally train both providers and scientists in an evolving healthcare landscape.
Dan Bronoske House, Pos. 2 28 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Jim Walsh* House, Pos. 1 19 Yes Yes No Yes
Liz Berry House, Pos. 2 36 Yes

I have experience responding to an economic crisis at the federal level when I worked for Congresswoman Gabby Giffords during the last Great Recession. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act saved jobs and created new ones while making investments in infrastructure, education, health and clean energy. What didn’t work was sending billions of dollars to bailout the big banks when they used the money to enrich themselves instead of keeping the credit flowing to small businesses and families struggling with foreclosures. These are important lessons learned that must be applied to our current economic crisis. Working on these important issues at the federal level taught me many lessons: the power of building coalitions to pass important policy priorities, the intricacies of the legislative process, and that economic downturns do not mean we sacrifice our progressive values and momentum to push important legislative goals forward. I am proud to be the only candidate in this race who has committed to not responding to this crisis by voting to impose austerity measures next session. I promise to hold the line against devastating budget cuts and protect people’s employment through this pandemic - and that means ensuring higher education is not harmed by austerity measures. Our knee-jerk reaction is to impose austerity, when in reality I believe we should be using our rainy-day fund and pursuing progressive revenue taxation as a means of addressing this crisis. I promise to hold the line against devastating budget cuts, and that is why I have been sole-endorsed by progressive champions like The Stranger, the FUSE Progressive Voters Guide, Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal, and labor unions representing 500,000+ frontline workers.
Yes

Yes. As stated above, I believe in the face of the budget shortfall we must be pursuing progressive taxation. Fixing Washington state’s upside-down tax code has always been one of my top priorities in the legislature, and with this present crisis, the urgency has never been greater. Our state budget is facing a multi-billion dollar shortfall, and now is NOT the time for austerity measures. We cannot be cutting services for the poor and middle-class while wealthy individuals and corporations do not pay an income tax. The time to fix this is now. We must use the momentum that this pandemic has created as a way to finally bring about real tax reform. I support the work of my seatmate Rep. Noel Frame who is leading the charge on tax reform in the legislature, and I support efforts to move this timeline up to 2021. I have experience building coalitions to pass meaningful legislation and that’s how I intend to lead in Olympia. Similar to Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal’s work as co-chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, I want to build a coalition of progressive legislators in Olympia who will come together to pass progressive policy. I am very proud that my campaign has been endorsed by Congresswoman Jayapal because she knows that I am a proven progressive leader who knows how to get things done. I believe increasing additional progressive revenue streams is the key to maintaining the funding commitments made in the WEIA.
Yes

Yes. This is one of my top priorities. I firmly believe we must be addressing systemic racism and its resulting inequities across all sectors: particularly in education. As a result I am eager to support public institutions financially in their efforts to address equity gaps in education. We cannot continue ignoring the link between race, education and economic barriers.
Yes

I am so proud of the way our flagship institution, UW, and UW Medicine specifically, have stepped up during the COVID-19 crisis. I will work with my colleagues in the legislature to ensure UW Medicine is fully funded to continue doing the work it does. I am proud to be sole-endorsed by many organizations who represent health professionals, including: SEIU Healthcare 1199NW, WSNA, SEIU 775, the Resident and Fellow Physician Union NW. I will stand with them and UW Medicine unequivocally in Olympia.
Javier Valdez* House, Pos. 2 46 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Eric Brown House, Pos. 1 46 Yes Yes

Legislators must make cuts, tighten their belt and make sure the WEIA is funded 100%. The budget shortfall should by no means excuse the Legislature from honoring its good faith legal responsibilities for funding higher education.
No

I am the maternal grandson of an American Black woman who earned a Master's degree in elementary education. Grandma made this accomplishment in the Jim Crow South. My grandma benefited from financial support of private philanthropists who wanted to see bright, talented young people, reach their highest potential. If we commit funds from the Legislature to BIPOC students I believe the Legislature will attempt to justify breaking it's commitment in the future. Private funding will give students unparalleled support at all times, and will help them achieve their great potential. It worked for my grandma.
Yes

We agree that the UW Medical Center is the lighthouse for academic medical centers in Washington. I believe budget cuts open up funding solutions that will no doubt financially stimulate the UW Medical Center.
Daniel Smith Senate 17 Yes

Having high-quality public universities is a point of pride for our state and for good reason. I will not let that suffer as a result of COVID-19. While we will certainly have tough choices to make in the state budget, we should not let those decisions disproportionately impact higher education
Yes

I will make every attempt to ensure that the funding commitments from the WEIA remain in place and fully-funded.
Yes

Equal access to education is a necessity to correct for centuries of racial oppression and help our neighbors of color achieve the economic justice they deserve. So-called “color blind” policies in education have failed to deliver sufficient positive results, and we know from experience that people of color suffer the most during economic downturns. We owe it to our state and to our neighbors to make intentional efforts to correct these gaps once and for all.
Yes

At a time when we need all hands on deck to fight the COVID-19 crisis, we cannot afford to let budget shortfalls hit our state’s premier medical institution
Devin Kuh House, Pos. 2 14 Yes

Equitable and accessible education must be our priority as a state at all levels.
Yes Yes

Equity must be the focus of all of our policy decisions.
Yes

Yes. I also believe that we need to implement Whole Washington to ensure that this investment in our medical professionals and our academic medical center is getting passed along to our entire community.
Mark Schoesler* Senate 9 Yes No

I told them this would happen, I will not vote for any B&O increase.
Yes See Comments

Have to see the proposed solution.
Katie Young House, Pos. 1 31 Yes

Providing residents with access to affordable education is a critical investment in the future of our state. We certainly will be facing tough cuts, but we know that an austerity approach will only damage our economy and hurt our residents.
Yes

Yes, education is a critical investment for our residents and our economy. Gutting education funding will not help our residents and it will not help our economy get back on track.
Yes

I hope there's a not-too-distant future that includes a low/no-cost higher education for every resident who wants to pursue it, but failing to understand and address the racism that's created generational inequality is racism at work and I want our government and state institutions to be actively anti-racist.
Yes
Thomas R Clark House, Pos. 2 31 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Cyndy Jacobsen House, Pos. 2 25 Yes No Yes Yes
Davina Duerr* House, Pos. 1 1 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Luanne Van Werven* House, Pos. 1 42 Yes

The legislature has made good progress in recent years, making up the imbalance between state funding and tuition. During this time, when students are forced into remote learning, raising tuition would further discourage students from pursuing their higher education goals.
See Comments

I did not support the funding mechanism enacted in the WEIA and believe it puts a financial burden on too many individuals who will never benefit from state-funded college.
No answer provided Yes
John P Gibbons House, Pos. 1 45 Yes Yes No

This is a more complex issue than just money. How many of the disadvantaged children are from single parent homes? We need to be tackling the root issue.
No

UW Medicine along with all of the healthcare in Washington State is suffering due to the restrictions placed upon them by Jay Inslee. We need to be looking at relief for all sectors of healthcare, not just UW Medicine.
My-Linh Thai* House, Pos. 2 41 Yes Yes Yes No answer provided
Alicia Rule House, Pos. 1 42 Yes

In the face of our budget shortfall, I am committed to reviewing the decisions made during the Great Recession and their long term impacts, so that we can learn from our mistakes. We must rebuild our economy to work for everyone- young students, working families, students who have decided to return to higher education.
Yes

I will look at all budget decisions from the standpoint of how we can rebuild our economy to work for everyone. Maintaining access to aid and programs that prepare students for jobs right here in Washington are critical for our families, and I will work to maintain those programs.
Yes

Education is a fundamental tool to address equity and economic gaps in our communities. When considering all budget decisions, I am committed to using a racial equity lens by engaging community in the decision-making process, identifying who will benefit or be burdened from a decision, and examining unintended consequences. From there I will work to ensure vulnerable populations are not overburdened by our decisions and mitigate for unintended consequences. Work at our public universities to address inequitable higher education policies are important for our BIPOC communities. As a first generation college graduate and an alumni of University of Washington’s American Ethnic Studies Department, it will be a great honor to use that education to give back to Washington State’s next generation in a meaningful way.
Yes
Drew Stokesbary* House, Pos. 1 31 Yes Yes Yes No answer provided
John Roskelley Senate 4 See Comments

“Each legislator or candidate for office has their specific issues. I am no exception…. higher education is not on [my] list. I feel there are many legislators who know this subject much better than I, and through listening and learning, I will educate myself on this very important topic. If you are wondering whether or not I believe the state should provide free higher education opportunities for everyone – I do not. I believe the state has a responsibility to provide an excellent public school K-12 education. After graduation, the individual should decide whether to further their education and where – but not at the taxpayer’s expense. The pandemic has brought the state to its knees and its senses. There just is not enough money through taxation of individuals and businesses to pay for the hundreds of millions, if not billions, it will take for a free higher education and still do all the other things government does for everyone, not just a very select group of people.”
Kerry French House, Pos. 1 33 Yes Yes

I believe keeping our commitments is important and will do the best I can to make sure we keep them, however, with the pandemic decimating our economy, I am not sure how this this will play out in the budget negotiations. As a new legislator, it is unlikely that I would be involved in the budget negotiations but I will do my best to keep the committments we have made.
See Comments

I support merit based admissions not racial quotas. I believe in treating people equally regardless of ethnicity or race.
Yes

The UW Medical Center has provided great service and training as well as innovative therapies and I would do all I could to support it.
Helen Price Johnson Senate 10 Yes Yes

WEIA is likely to face significant reduction in funding due to this economic downturn. Now is the time to work with local businesses to invest in our students either through state aid, corporate internships, business apprenticeships or corporate aid programs that help prepare students for jobs.
Yes

The wealth gap will not decrease until we make access to opportunities in higher education equitable and have strong outcomes that improve our economy.
Yes

As Senator, I will work to support financial solutions for UW Medicine. Please visit my website: helenpricejohnson.org for more information about my experience as an elected official, campaign issues and legislative priorities.
Sarah Reyneveld House, Pos. 2 36 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Shirley Sutton House, Pos. 1 32 Yes

Yes, absolutely. I am against austerity cuts to the budget. Washington state's higher education system is one of the most important of our public institutions. I will pursue progressive mechanisms for creating new funding sources.
Yes Yes

Higher education is instrumental to closing the equity gap and also economic disparities experienced by BIPOC and low income individuals.
Yes
Dan Griffey* House, Pos. 1 35 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Sherae Lascelles House, Pos. 2 43 Yes

Funding higher education is a matter of equity. Our state’s constitution holds a promise to prioritize funding education foremost, and yet, Washington consistently fails on this promise-- both in k-12 as well as in higher education. I will work to ensure that higher education does not bear budget cuts, because instead of navigating where to cut education based on proposed austerity budgets, I will be working to overhaul our state’s tax system to bring in the revenue that we need to robustly fund education. To do this, I will legislate in support of a WA state income tax as well as a state-earned income tax credit. Equitable access to higher education will be paramount to realizing economic equity, as part of the path towards racial equity, both of which must reside on the pathway towards environmental justice. We need innovation, and we need the folks who will be most impacted by our nation’s looming health, environmental, science, and technological crises to be centered in the spaces of higher education, so that they/we can lead the way forward.
Yes

Absolutely, and then some. The Washington Education Investment Act is the gateway to higher education for so many who have been systematically left out of this deeply gate-kept life experience, and the privileges that higher education offers. Further, Washington’s WEIA is a more open version than seen in other states which meets students where they’re at. I support this. Further, Microsoft is one tech company who has gone on the books stating that they should pay more into this fund as they benefit disproportionately from this program, adding value to their corporation when they onboard these advanced hires. Thus, I propose we not only maintain, but tap outrageously wealthy tech companies to significantly expand their contributions.
Yes

Yes. This is the work I do every day of my life. See above. We will leverage the wealth of this state to center those who have been systematically marginalized generationally since the Duwamish and other indigenous folks were removed from their respective lands throughout Washington. We will fund this. The funding must be there; it is the way towards a more equitable future.
Yes

Yes. And my vision for funding universal healthcare at the state level is a large part of why the University of Washington Housestaff Association (UWHA), the labor union representing resident and fellow physicians at UW Medicine and affiliated hospitals-- Harborview, Seattle Children’s, the VA, UW Northwest, among other clinics has given me their sole endorsement. This epidemic has been a light that illuminates all the cracks in the foundation of our state’s collective health. Now that so many know just how vulnerable the state is-- as it has been built, we can move forward in solidarity to rebuild the foundation of health. This is the reason why, instead of just repairing our current models, we need to put a lot more money into bringing up new healthcare workers, and funding state of the art healthcare solutions. No human is expendable. Healthcare is a human right. To put that idea in praxis, we need to be heavily investing in healthcare workers to ensure the wellbeing and livelihood of all people, especially the wellbeing of our healthcare workers. Universal healthcare for all. Public housing. Universal childcare for all. We must rebuild this state with universal care so that all people of our district and state can access the potential of our University of Washington Healthcare Providers. Your physicians know me to be the best candidate for the wellness of their patients and their practice. Yes, I will be working for them in Olympia.
Veronica Whitcher Rockett House, Pos. 2 2 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Shir Regev House, Pos. 1 8 Yes

Don't hold this against me, I'm a WSU alumna but I was attending WSU in 2008 when higher ed budgets were gutted so I know how painful those cuts are and will fight to minimize them.
Yes Yes Yes
Larry Springer* House, Pos. 2 45 Yes Yes Yes Yes

UW Medicine is clearly a leader in the COVID response and we need to assure that continues
Ron Muzzall* Senate 10 Yes No Yes No
Joy Stanford House, Pos. 2 26 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Chukundi Salisbury House, Pos. 2 37 Yes

First of all, I am absolutely opposed to austerity focused recovery from the COVID-19 Crisis. We saw during the great recession that budget cuts are not the way out of these crises. Second, I am opposed to any cuts to higher education funding, along with the K-12 budget, as it is our strongest long term public policy tool. I intend to ensure that our student’s futures are not used to fill a short-term budget hole. I believe that defunding our bloated and racist prison system is a much more effective policy goal, as it will not only help close the shortfall but also advance equity.
Yes

The failure to fully fund higher education has been a persistent problem, even before the COVID-19 crisis. The critical underfunding of the state's need grant for years was a disgrace. This is why I was excited to see WEIA passed in 2019. Education is the best public policy tool we have to assure lifelong success and solve our social ills. However, we cannot make short term cuts knowing that our students will pay the price down the road. As the elected representative to Olympia, I will work to defend the funding commitments made in the WEIA from any attempted budget cuts, and work to fund this commitment past the end of the crisis.
Yes

The intersection of racial justice and education has been a lifelong focus for me. I attended an HBCU, and have founded the 100 Black Parents Initiative, in the hopes of giving disadvantaged black youth an even footing. I support any effort to close the grotesque racial wealth gap. In the Seattle Metro, the average wealth of a white family is $456,000 while a black family is just $23,000. I absolutely support funding our public institution to address this equity gap. However, I want to go beyond just the economic solutions. I believe we need to repeal I-200, which bans affirmative action and implement steps to further hire more black faculty at our public universities. I believe that we should also increase the diversity course requirements, create grants for BIPOC student organizations and ethnic studies departments, and support universities in disarming and divesting from police forces. I also am proud to be endorsed by Emile Pitre and Larry Gossett, two of the founders of the UW BSU, and would be excited to work with the next generation of BIPOC leaders at our universities.
Yes

We should not be furloughing and reducing medical staff during a pandemic. We need to defend UW medicine as a leading academic medical center and find financial solutions to any budget shortfalls. These staff reduction and furloughs have real-world implications on the economy and the individuals affected. I look forward to working with my future colleagues to find a solution that has a meaningful impact that matches our intent.
April Berg House, Pos. 2 44 Yes

Yes, protecting higher education – and its students – from budget cuts is a high priority for me. As a current Director for the Everett School District and a former Edmonds School Board Member, I understand the importance of fully funded education programs across learning levels. We absolutely must prioritize funding for our institutions of higher education against the threat of budget cuts. This continued funding is critical for tuition affordability, academic strength, and student achievement and opportunity.
Yes

Yes, I will work to maintain the funding commitments made in the WEA. The WEIA is essential to providing funds to subsidize or cover the cost of post-secondary education for students and communities in need. It is a powerful and landmark tool for driving equity in our schools. I believe that this funding for apprenticeships, community and technical colleges, and universities is essential to ensuring equal access to education, increasing access to good paying jobs, and empowering our workforce for years to come. We cannot compromise on equitable, quality education for our students.
Yes

Yes, it is important that our public institutions of education address equity gaps in education and encourage economic mobility. I will support and advocate for funds directed towards this purpose. I recognize firsthand how racism, sexism, and other prejudices are embedded in our society and I will work to continue effectively advocating for change in our systems, including institutes of higher education. Affordable, quality education for all goes hand in hand with a just and equitable society – we cannot achieve the latter without the former. I am committed to elevating the voices of BIPOC communities, serving as a voice for real policy changes and investments that reflect necessary public calls to action.
Yes

Yes, UW Medicine plays a significant role in both education and in health care. I am committed to supporting and advocating for financial solutions for UW Medicine – wholly necessary as we respond to this pandemic and continue educating and developing new healthcare leaders. I will gladly work with stakeholders to provide necessary funding for UW Medicine and its students and researchers who positively impact our community in countless ways.
Timm Ormsby* House, Pos. 2 3 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Alex Ramel* House, Pos. 2 40 Yes

I'm committed to avoiding an austerity approach to budgeting. In the last recession legislators focused on cuts and balanced the budget on the backs of students, the working poor and others who could least afford it. That approach was unfair and prolonged the recession. This time we should work to fix our unfair tax code, bring in progressive revenue and protect our essential services, including higher education.
Yes

I was proud to vote for the 2020 adjustments to rebalance the funding to keep the Washington College Promise. With one year of experience we knew that we needed to fix the details to make it work, and we acted. If the current recession causes a shortfall, I'm committed to making the changes needed to protect this investment in our people and in our future.
Yes

Going forward, I'm committed to making equity a consideration in every decision we make. Whether it is about policing, housing, environmental policy, or education, we have to acknowledge that a history and a deep culture rooted in inequity doesn't go away with one bill or one set of actions. So we need to be systematic and data driven and work diligently to root out racism throughout our institutions.
Yes
Ingrid Anderson Senate 5 Yes

Yes, I will be a strong advocate for our institutions of higher education. Investing in higher education is critical for developing and maintaining a strong workforce, something we will need in order to ensure economic recovery. I am especially committed to fighting for the services, programs, and resources that ensure tuition affordability – especially for low-income students.
Yes

Absolutely. The WEIA is a groundbreaking program that supports the students most in need. We have to make sure all Washington students continue to have access to our institutions of higher learning, and the WEIA is an integral part of growing equity and opportunity for students who face economic barriers to attending college. This program is also to the significant advantage of employers all over Washington who are looking for a strong, local workforce. It is a mutually beneficial deal, and I will work hard to make sure it is maintained as we face an upcoming budget crisis.
Yes

Yes – prioritizing these efforts and expanding equity goals to better support underserved students and communities should be a top priority. Increasing accessibility to higher education – and the economic opportunity it can drive – is very important to me. We know that BIPOC communities often lack the same opportunities as other students. I will gladly work with community leaders and higher education stakeholders to address equity gaps and demand fairness in higher education.
Yes

As a nurse, the issue of accessible, quality healthcare couldn’t be more important to me. UW Medicine is crucial for preparing the next generation of healthcare professionals and ensuring a healthy, thriving region – especially during this pandemic. As a Senator, I will be highly engaged in these efforts and a committed advocate for protecting needed funding for UW Medicine.
Vandana Slatter* House, Pos. 1 48 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Liz Lovelett* Senate 40 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Mark Mullet* Senate 5 Yes

We can go backwards on higher ed after all the progress we have made in the past eight years.
Yes

If we promised a student aid - we have to keep our promise.
Yes

More specifically, I would like to find a way to get more students of color to become teachers of color.
Yes

I'm always willing to listen to the concerns of the UW to make sure the State is being a partner to help address your challenges.
Pat Sullivan* House, Pos. 2 47 Yes

I believe that education is an essential part of any successful economy and society. Education has always been my top priority, and I will continue to work towards an educational system that allows our institutions and students to flourish. This year, our state will feel the impact of COVID-19 throughout our economy, but I am committed to ensuring that educational funding is not unduly impacted by upcoming budget decisions. We also enacted limits on tuition increases that was not in effect during the last recession.
Yes

The investments we made in higher education and workforce development that we enacted through the Workforce Education Investment Act are especially critical during an economic recession. I was proud to have worked on the passage of this legislation and will work on finding ways to plug the holes caused by the current economic crisis.
Yes

I believe in increased funding for our state's educational system, and I am always looking for ways to lessen the financial hardship for students attending college. Many of our young people—and particularly those from marginalized groups—struggle to find their economic footing after college due to crushing student loan debt. This is why I have introduced a bill to provide a 1% interest rate on student loans. I believe this would help to increase racial equity in our public institutions. Finally, I am always open to new ideas for improving equity in higher education, and I look forward to working with groups like One America and UW Impact to identify other legislative avenues for increasing equity.
Yes

Healthcare funding is an extremely important component of our state’s recovery from COVID-19. UW Medicine is an integral part of our state’s healthcare system, and I am committed to ensuring it remains a preeminent, high-quality academic medical center. . I will work hard with colleagues in the State Legislature to find pragmatic financial solutions for UW Medicine and our state's healthcare systems that ensure adequate staffing and exceptional quality for patients.
Carrie Hesch House, Pos. 1 26 Yes Yes Yes Yes
T'wina Nobles Senate 28 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Martin Moore House, Pos. 1 30 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Koshin Mohamed Fudaar House, Pos. 1 29 Yes

Zero budget cuts to our historically under funded education system period.
Yes

Definitely. I have vested interest to defend your efforts. I have 4 school age children and 1 of them is will be eligible to start college next year. As a working parent I know my children will not have the educational support they need without WEIA.
Yes

Addressing Equity gap of our student is national security issue.
Yes

As an Alumni of University of Washington, I am in favor of supporting.
Sam Hunt* Senate 22 Yes

The budget picture is less gloomy after the recent revenue forecast. However, we need to modernize our 19th Century tax system and make it more responsive. I will vote for progressive revenues to help avoid cuts to higher education.
Yes

We will need to address the revenue reductions resulting from recent court decisions.
Yes

The time to act begins in 2021.
Yes

And as a Cougar, I will also work to support funding for the WSU Elson Floyd Medical Center.
Claus Joens House, Pos. 1 39 Yes

We need to raise revenue instead of forcing budget cuts.
Yes

Again, we need to look at increasing revenue instead of forcing budget cuts.
Yes

The state should make public education at least through the community college level free.
Yes

As someone born in Pullman to two WSU student parent's, I am well known for supporting the Cougs and sounding off on our PAC-12 rivalry. However, I have never made any unsupportive statements regarding the UW academic and medical programs, as I have the utmost respect for your institution. As I understand it, the UW teaching hospital is the finest GP teaching hospital IN THE WORLD. That costs money. The UW has made no attempt to hide that, and has always been completely above board with the state legislature and the general public. I will staunchly defend all your academic and medical programs.
Brian Blake* House, Pos. 2 19 Yes

While the budget forecasts continue to improve, there will likely be cuts to many areas of the state budget. Higher education, from our largest university to our smallest community and technical college, should not be affected to a greater extent than other areas. Even during this crisis, we need to think in the long-term. Higher education is the foundation of communities, growing local economies and better educating the leaders of tomorrow, we cannot afford to hamstring those efforts.
Yes

When I voted for the Washington Education Investment Act, I made a commitment to make sure it is effective, funded, and makes an impact for Washington families. I will work every day to maintain the funding commitments made in the WEIA.
Yes

I support building and maintaining programs that address the equity caps in education and encourage economic mobility. I look forward to working with our public universities and the State Board for Technical and Community Colleges and other stakeholders to address this issue in next year's session.
Yes

UW Medicine is a unique part of our state. I look forward to working with the representatives from that district and those with expertise in higher education, and UW specifically, to find solution to keep UW at the top of our country's academic medical centers.
Terry Harder House, Pos. 2 29 Yes

We have a spending problem if controlled would mean few cuts if any would be needed.
Yes

We have a spending problem if controlled would mean few cuts if any would be needed.
No

I believe a person motivated to achieve will always find a way to succeed. I think racial quotas are wrong headed and will not support them.
Yes
Marianna Everson House, Pos. 1 19 Yes

We must invest in the people of our state, not make cuts. We must bring in more from those who can afford it. We have a great un-tapped resource in WA. The wealthy will pay their fair share of taxes.
Yes

The WEIA is needed more than ever and I will fight to fully fund it.
Yes

Its past time to address the inequities in our systems.
Yes

UW Medicine must have all the resources needed to provide all the services we rely on as a region.
Shelley Kloba* House, Pos. 2 1 Yes Yes

I think we should also consider removing the preferential treatment that certain companies have been granted, allowing them to avoid paying their fair share. This could alleviate the potential shortfall.
Yes Yes
Jake Fey* House, Pos. 2 27 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Amy Walen* House, Pos. 2 48 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Keith Goehner* House, Pos. 1 12 Yes See Comments

Since the funding comes from business taxes, this will be a difficult program to keep at its current level. I support educational opportunities and will work to create more equitable funding sources.
See Comments

Without knowing what the specifics are, it is difficult to make a commitment on funding. I support narrowing the gaps and making economic mobility more attainable.
Yes

Medical facilities and personnel should be a high priority for our society.
Rick Payne Senate 2 Yes No answer provided Yes Yes
Zack Zappone House, Pos. 1 6 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Lance Gurel House, Pos. 2 4 Yes Yes Yes Yes
Eric Robertson House, Pos. 2 31 Yes Yes Yes No answer provided
Brian Thompson House, Pos. 1 21 Yes No answer provided No answer provided No answer provided